Can I tell you about Auditory Processing Disorder? ISBN: 9781785924941
Mountjoy, Alyson and Davies, Kelly
Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018
Auditory Processing Disorder or APD is a little-known condition that affects the way people hear. It is not, usually, connected with hearing loss, but is a brain problem that affects how one hears. 'My brain makes mistakes, not my ears,' says Amy, who tells us her story. The brain doesn't always understand speech properly, and this leads to misunderstandings and great difficulties, particularly in noisy places. Children who have the condition can have it in a number of different ways, which means diagnosis is very difficult. Amy's mother has realised that there is something wrong with Amy's understanding of speech, and that it is worse if she is tired or ill or worried. Mum makes sure that Amy gets the battery of different tests she needs to get the help at school that is so necessary. The condition is one that people can be born with, but also can be due to injury. Amy's friend, Tom, also has APD, and both children end up with a full APD diagnosis, which is important because it is only with this that the school must provide the support they need, whether this is an FM hearing system, a quiet room to work in where necessary, written notes and instructions, or altered homework. Children with the condition can be disruptive in class because they don't understand what is going on, and sometimes they develop learning difficulties because of this disconnection between hearing and the brain. The book, part of the excellent Can I Tell You About series from Jessica Kingsley, will be a revelation to those of us who have never heard of APD and will certainly provide great support for children, parents and teachers who need to understand about kids who need lots of help in school. There are black and white drawings interspersed through the story and good information for parents, teachers and care givers. Available form Amazon, from book shops, and from the publisher: www.jkp.com.
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